Keaton Report 8/15,16, 2014

Trout were eating it up between thunderstorms over the weekend with my charters landing limits each day. Friday, I had Joe Wallace and Ellen Williams down from Vermont for a week's stay at Sea Hag at Keaton and they landed 15 trout weighing in at  29.04 pounds! We fished live pinfish under Back Bays in 4.5 - 5.5 feet of water for their limit.
Saturday and Sunday I took Stan and Tyler Bryant, with Kyle Stamper, all of Warner Robins, Ga. out and we had 20 trout weighing 31.3 pounds and 34.2 pounds respectively. We had three over 21" long Saturday and one over 23" Sunday. Live pinfish and pigfish were the ticket again, while we landed some of the largest trout from 3.5 feet both days. We also caught a few nice trout on Assassin's Violet Moon and Sand Trout five inch shads.
Sharks continue to rule the calm slick water on the tide changes and we lost four rigs in under 30 minutes to large "noseeums" Monday, while catching 9 nice trout once the water started moving for Ray Carlile and Jim Watson of Obrien, Florida. We had to go in early as the Thunderstorms took over the Gulf after fishing less than two hours.
Here is a report from Sea Hag at Keaton Beach :
Tracey Green of Statenville, Ga had his limit of scallops for two days from 3 - 4 ft of water 7/26 & 7/27
8/7 Ken McMillan , Steve Roberts and Pat Carmichael of Gwinnett county, Ga. had their limit of six reds fishing with live shrimp and live pinfish somewhere "down South"
Last week I met Theresa and Albert Ellershaw with Tom and Donna Throm from Cocoa Beach down for a week on their annual ten-year tradition of coming to Keaton Beach to scallop and they had their limit for four days in a row! The Throms daughter and son-in-law were coming in from Colorado to join them for the last three days of their vacation. I saw several other boats cleaning what looked to be a limit of scallops, each day over the weekend, but sorry I didn't get any names or locations.
Now that the crowds have diminished limits are more common and some claim scallops to still be coming in on each subsequent tide.
Just Remember to FLY Your Dive Flags. It's the LAW!